Bibliographies

  • T. Agerschou, Preventing radicalization and discrimination in Aarhus, Journal for Deradicalization, 1, 2014, pp. 5-22.
  • D. Al-Raffie, Social Identity Theory for Investigating Islamic Extremism in the Diaspora, Journal of Strategic Security 6(4), 2013.
  • J. Bartlett, The Edge of Violence: Towards Telling the Difference Between Violent and Non-Violent Radicalization, Terrorism and Political Violence, 1, 2012, pp. 1 - 21.
  • C. Benard, A Future for the Young Options for helping Middle Eastern Youth Escape the Trap of Radicalization, RAND’s Initiative on Middle Eastern Youth, 2005.
  • T. Bjørgo, Racist and right-wing violence in Scandinavia: patterns, perpetrators, and responses, Aschehoug, Oslo, 1997.
  • T. Bjørgo - J. Horgan, Leaving Terrorism Behind: Individual and Collective Disengagement, Routledge, London, 2009.
  • L. Blaydes – L. Rubin, Ideological Reorientation and Counterterrorism: Confronting Militant Islam in Egypt, Terrorism and Political Violence 20(4), 2008, pp. 461 - 479.
  • R. Borum, Understanding the terrorist mindset, FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin 72(7), pp. 7-10.
  • C. Boucek, Saudi Arabia’s “Soft” Counterterrorism Strategy: Prevention, Rehabilitation, and Aftercare, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, Washington D.C., September 2008.
  • H. Breen, Violent Islamism in Egypt from 1997 to 2012, Norwegian Defence Research Establishment, Oslo, 2013.
  • S. Brzuszkiewicz, Saudi Arabia: The De-Radicalization Program Seen from Within, Institute for International Political Studies, Milan, 2017.
  • S. Brzuszkiewicz, Counter-radicalization and de-radicalization in Egypt and Libya: Returnees and Foresight, Washington Institute for Near East Policy, June 2017.
  • K. Christmann, Preventing Religious Radicalisation and Violent Extremism A Systematic Review of the Research Evidence, Youth Justice Board, 2012.
  • F. Cilluffo - S. Cardash - L. O. Khor, Detainee Release and Global Public Safety: Terrorist Disengagement and Deradicalization Programs – The Way Ahead, Homeland Security Policy Institute, Washington D.C., 2014.
  • F. Cilluffo - G. Saathoff (Eds.), NETWorked Radicalization: A Counter-Strategy, The George Washington University Homeland Security Policy Institute (HSPI), The University of Virginia Critical Incident Analysis Group (CIAG), 2007.
  • M. Creenshaw, The Psychology of Terrorism: An Agenda for the 21st Century, Political Psychology 21(2), 2000.
  • K. Davis - K. Cragin, Social science for counterterrorism: Putting the Pieces Together, RAND, Santa Monica, 2009.
  • A. Dalgaard-Nielsen, Violent Radicalization in Europe: What we know and what we do not know, Studies in Conflict & Terrorism, 33, 2010, pp. 797 - 814.
  • M. Dechesne, Radicalization and Mass Violence from a Beckerian Perspective: Conceptual and Empirical Considerations, Journal for Deradicalization, 3, 2015, pp. 149 - 177.
  • H. El-Said, De-Radicalising Islamists: Programmes and their Impact in Muslim Majority States, Developments in Radicalisation and Political Violence, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation and Political Violence (ICSR), London, 2012.
  • H. El-Said – J. Harrigan, Globalisation. Democratisation and Radicalisation in the Arab Word, Palgrave Macmillan, London, 2011.  
  • H. El-Said, Clemency, civil accord and reconciliation: the evolution of Algeria's deradicalisation process, in H. el-Said - J. Harrigan (Eds.), Deradicalising violent extremists: counter-radicalisation and deradicalisation programmes and their impact in Muslim majority states, Routledge, London, 2012, pp. 14 - 49.
  • L. Farrall, Navigating lived experience: reflections from the field, Journal for Deradicalization, 4, 2014, pp. 120 - 144.
  • S. Gates – S. Podder, Social Media, Recruitment, Allegiance and the Islamic State, Perspectives on Terrorism 9(4), 2015, pp. 107 - 116.
  • M. Hafez, The Ties that Bind: How Terrorists Exploit Family Bonds. CTC Sentinel, 9(2), 2016, pp. 15-17.
  • J. Horgan, Walking Away from Terrorism: Accounts of Disengagement from Radical and Extremist Movements, Routledge, New York, 2009.
  • J. Horgan - M. Altier, The Future of Terrorist De-Radicalization Programs, Georgetown Journal of International Affairs, Washington D.C., 2012.
  • J. Horgan, What makes a terrorist stop being a terrorist?, Journal for Deradicalization, 1, 2014, pp. 1 - 4.
  • R. Kana - R. Dore, Countering Radicalisation Across Europe – The Pioneering ISDEP Project, Journal for Deradicalization, 1, 2014, pp. 23 - 25.
  • D. Köhler, The Radical Online: Individual Radicalization Processes and the Role of the Internet, Journal for Deradicalization, 1, 2014, pp. 116 - 134.
  • Kundnani, Radicalisation: the journey of a concept, Race & Class 54(2), 2012, pp. 3 - 25.
  • C. McCauley, Group desistance from terrorism: A dynamic perspective, Dynamics of Asymmetric Conflict 1(3), 2008, pp. 269 - 293.
  • C. McCauley - S. Moskalenko, Mechanisms of Political Radicalization: Pathways Toward Terrorism, Routledge, New York, 2008. 
  • McCauley - S. Moskalenko, Friction. How Radicalization Happens to Them and Us, Oxford University Press, 2011.
  • M. Morris - F. Eberhard - J. Rivera - M. Watsula, Deradicalization: A Review of the Literature with Comparison to Findings in the Literatures on Deganging and Deprogramming, Institute for Homeland Security Solutions, Durham, 2010.
  • P. Nesser, Jihad in Europe. Exploring the motivations for Salafi-Jihadi terrorism in Europe post-millennium, Department of Political Science, University of Oslo, Oslo, 2004.
  • P. Nesser, Islamist Terrorism in Europe: A History, Hurst, London, 2015.
  • P. Neumann, Prison and Terrorism. Radicalization and Deradicalization in 15 Countries, The International Centre for the Study of Radicalization and Political Violence (ICSR), London, 2010.
  • M. Noonan - P. Khalil, North American Foreign Fighters, Journal for Deradicalization, 1, 2014, pp. 66 - 96.
  • S. Noor - S. Hayat, Deradicalization: Approaches and Models, Pak Institute for Peace Studies (PIPS), Islamabad, 2009.
  • B. Patterson Jr., Evolutionary Emotional Intelligence for Social Workers: Status and the Psychology of Group Violence, Journal for Deradicalization, 2, 2015, pp. 119 - 137.
  • B. Perry, Button-down Terror: the Metamorphosis of the Hate Movement, Sociological Focus 33(2), pp. 113 - 131, 2000.
  • D. Pisoiu, Subculture: The third wave of European jihad, Journal for Deradicalization, 2, 2015, pp. 163 - 170.
  • A. Rabasa - S. Pettyjohn - J. Ghez - C. Boucek, Deradicalizing Islamist Extremists, RAND National Security Research Division, Santa Monica, 2010.
  • C. Richardson, Relative Deprivation Theory in Terrorism: a Study of Higher Education and Unemployment as Predictors of Terrorism, New York University, New York, 2011.
  • M. Sageman, Leaderless Jihad. Terror networks in the twenty-first century, University of Pennsylvania Press, Philadelphia, 2007.
  • M. Scheuer, Reinforcing the Mujahedeen: Origins of Jihadi Manpower, Terrorism Focus 3(18), May 9, 2006.
  • P. Schmid, Radicalisation, De-Radicalisation, Counter-Radicalisation: A Conceptual Discussion and Literature Review, ICCT Research Paper, International Centre for Counter-Terrorism (ICCT), The Hague, 2013.
  • M. Sedgwick, The Concept of Radicalization as a Source of Confusion, Terrorism and Political Violence 22(4), 2010, pp. 479 - 494.
  • J. Stehlik, The State of Play in Counter-Radicalisation in the EU,  Faes Paper 189, Foundation for Social Studies and Analysis (Fundación para el Análisis y los Estudios Sociales), Madrid, 2016.
  • J. Stern, A future challenges essay, Deradicalization or Disengagement of Terrorists Is It Possible?, Hoover Institution, Stanford University, 2010.
  • J. Stern, Mind over Martyr. How to deradicalize Islamist Extremists, Foreign Affairs, January/February 2010.
  • S.J. Toope – E. Iacobucci, After the Paris attacks: responses in Canada, Europe, and around the globe, University of Toronto Press, Toronto, 2015.
  • L. Vidino, Sharia4: From Confrontational Activism to Militancy, Perspectives on Terrorism 9(2), 2015.
  • L. Vidino, The Evolution of the Post-9/11 Threat in the United States, in B. Hoffman – F. Reinares, The Evolution of the Global Terrorist Threat: From 9/11 to Osama bin Laden's Death, Columbia University Press, New York City, 2014.
  • L. Vidino, Home-Grown Jihadism in Italy: Birth, Development and Radicalization Dynamics, ISPI (Istituto per gli studi di politica internazionale) and European Foundation for Democracy, April 2014.
  • L. Vidino – J. Brandon, Countering Radicalization in Europe, International Centre for the Study of Radicalization, King’s College London, December 2012.
  • L. Vidino, The Buccinasco pentiti: a unique case study of radicalization, Terrorism and Political Violence 23(3), pp. 398 - 418, 2011.
  • L. Vidino, Radicalization, Linkage and Diversity: Current Trends in Terrorism in Europe, Occasional Paper, RAND Corporation, July 2011.
  • L. Vidino, Countering Radicalization in America: Lessons from Europe, special report for the U.S. Institute of Peace, November 2010.
  • L. Vidino, The Role of Non-Violent Islamists in Europe, CTC Sentinel, December 2010, p. 9.
  • L. Vidino, Homegrown Jihadist Terrorism in the United States: A New and Occasional Phenomenon?, Studies in Conflict & Terrorism 32(1), January 2009.
  • I. Von Behr - A. Reding - C. Edwards - L. Gribbon, Radicalisation in the digital era. The use of the internet in 15 cases of terrorism and extremism, RAND, Brussels, 2013.
  • J. Wheatley – C. McCauley, Losing your audience: Desistance from terrorism in Egypt after Luxor, Dynamics of Asymmetric Conflict 1(3), 2008, pp. 250 - 268.
  • Q. Wiktorowicz (Ed.), Islamic activism. A social movement theory approach, Indiana University Press, Bloomington, 2004.
  • M. Youssef, Revolt Against Modernity: Muslim Zealots and the West, Brill, Leiden, 1985.
  • L. Alkhouri – A. Kassirer, Governing the Caliphate: The Islamic State Picture. CTC Sentinel, 8(8), August 2015, pp. 17-20.
  • H. Al-Ribaki, Competing Perspectives on Countering ISIS, Perspectives on Terrorism, 10(2), 2015, pp. 118-119.
  • J. Al-Tamimi, The Evolution in Islamic State Administration: The Documentary Evidence. Perspectives on Terrorism, 9(4), 2015, pp. 117-129. URL:
  • A. Arosoaie, Doctrinal Differences between ISIS and Al Qaeda: An Account of Ideologues, Counter Terrorist Trends and Analysis 7(7), 2015, pp. 31-37.
  • M. Awad, The Islamic State’s Pyramid Scheme: Egyptian Expansion and the Giza Governorate Cell, CTC Sentinel 9(4), 2016, pp. 32-38.
  • M. Awad – S. Tadros, Bay’a Remorse? Wilayat Sinai and the Nile Valley, CTC Sentinel 8(8), 2015. 1-7.
  • R. Barrett, The Islamic State Goes Global, CTC Sentinel 8(11), 2015, pp 1-4.
  • M. Bloom, Cubs of the Caliphate: The Children of ISIS, Foreign Affairs, July 21, 2015.
  • M. Bloom – J. Horgan – C. Winter, Depictions of Children and Youth in the Islamic State’s Martyrdom Propaganda, 2015-2016. CTC Sentinel 9(2), 2016, pp. 29-32.
  • S. Brzuszkiewicz, Political De-radicalization: Why it is no longer Possible in the Wilayat System of the Islamic State, Journal for Deradicalization, 9, 2017, pp. 185-204.
  • D. Byman, Al Qaeda, the Islamic State, and the Global Jihadist Movement. (What Everyone Needs to Know®). Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2015.
  • D. Byman, The Homecomings: What Happens when Arab Foreign Fighters in Iraq and Syria Return? Studies in Conflict & Terrorism, 38(8), 2015, pp. 581-602.
  • AN. Celso, How to Defeat the Islamic State: Crafting a Rational War Strategy, Small Wars Journal, 9/2015.
  • B. Dixon, Thwarting Recruitment Efforts and Radicalization in the West: One Part of a Multipronged Approach to Combating ISIS. The Journal on Terrorism and Security Analysis, 11, 2016, pp. 33-52.
  • J.P. Filiu, From Deep State to Islamic State: The Arab Counter-Revolution and its Jihadi Legacy. Hurst, London, 2016.
  • F. Gerges, ISIS: A History. Princeton University Press, Princeton, 2016.
  • R. Gunaratna, Global Threat Forecast: The Rise of ISIS, Counter Terrorist Trends and Analysis 7(11), 2015-2016, pp. 6-11.
  • R. Gunaratna, The “Brussels Invasion” through ISIS’ Eyes, Counter Terrorist Trends and Analysis 8(3), 2016, pp. 9-14
  • A. Hashim, The Caliphate at War: The Ideological, Organisational and Military Innovations of Islamic State, Hurst, London, 2017.
  • A. Hashim, Caliphate at War: Islamic State Ideology, War Fighting and State Formation, Terrorism Monitor 13(24), 2015, pp. 16-20.
  • A. Hassan (in press): Tribes of ISIS: Infiltrating Terror Networks in the Middle East. I.B. Tauris, London.
  • T. Hegghammer, Special Issue on the Islamic State. Perspectives on Terrorism, 9(4), 2015.  
  • T. Hegghammer – P. Nesser, Assessing the Islamic State’s Commitment to Attacking the West. Perspectives on Terrorism 9(4), 2015, pp. 14-30.
  • N. Kalyvas, Is ISIS a Revolutionary Group and if Yes, What Are the Implications? Perspectives on Terrorism 9(4), 2015, pp. 42-47.
  • B. Lia, Understanding Jihadi Proto-States, Perspectives on Terrorism 9(4), 2015, pp. 31-41.
  • C. Lister, The Syrian Jihad: Al-Qaeda, the Islamic State and the Evolution of an Insurgency, Hurst, London, 2015.
  • C. Lister, A Long Way from Success: Assessing the War on the Islamic State, Perspectives on Terrorism 9(4), 2015, pp. 3-13.
  • M. Lombardi, Islamic State Communication Project. Sicurezza, Terrorismo e Società, 1, 2015, pp. 99-133.
  • W. McCants, The ISIS Apocalypse: The History, Strategy, and Doomsday Vision of the Islamic State, St. Martin’s Press, New York City, 2015.
  • A. Speckhard, Bride of ISIS, Advances Press, McLean, 2015.
  • M. Weiss – H. Hassan, ISIS: Inside the Army of Terror, Regan Arts, New York City, 2016.
  • P. Bergen, The Osama Bin Laden I Know: An Oral History of Al-Qaeda's Leader, Free Press, 9 Aug. 2009.
  • R. Bonney, Jihad: From Qurʾan to bin Laden, Palgrave Macmillan, London, 2004.
  • D. Byman, Al Qaeda, the Islamic State, and the Global Jihadist Movement, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2015.
  • J. Corbin, Al-Qaeda: In Search of the Terror Network that Threatens the World, Hachette Book Group, New York City, 2003.
  • D. Cook, Understanding Jihad, University of California Press, Berkeley and Los Angeles, 2005.
  • R. Furnish, Holiest Wars: Islamic Mahdis, Their Jihads, and Osama bin Laden, Praeger, Santa Barbara, 2005.
  • M. Gerges, The Far Enemy: Why Jihad Went Global, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2005.
  • M. Gerges, Journey of the Jihadist: Inside Muslim Militancy, Harcourt, Boston, 2006.
  • R. Gunaratna, Inside Al-Qaeda: Global Network of Terror, Columbia University Press, New York City, 2002.
  • J. Jones, Think Again: al Qaeda, Foreign Policy, 193, May/June 2012, pp. 47 - 51.
  • M. Juergensmeyer, Terror in the Mind of God. The Global Rise of Religious Violence, University of California Press, Berkeley - Los Angeles - London, 2003.
  • G. Kepel, Jihad: The Trail of Political Islam, I. B. Tauris, New York City, 2000.
  • G. Kepel, The war for Muslim minds. Islam and the West, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, 2004.
  • L. Mansfield, In His Own Words. A Translation of the Writings of Dr. Ayman al-Zawahiri, TLG Publications, United States, 2006.
  • D. Cook, Understanding Jihad, University of California Press, Ber
  • M. Mohamedou, Al Qaeda. From the Near to the Far Enemy and Back (1988 – 2008), in K. Mulaj (Ed.), Violent Non-State Actors in Contemporary World Politics, Columbia University Press, New York City, 2009, pp. 207 - 237.
  • A. Plebani (Ed), New (and old) patterns of jihadism: al-Qa’ida, the Islamic State and beyond, Institute for International Political Studies, Milan, 2014.
  • O. Roy, Globalized Islam: The Search for a New Ummah, Columbia University Press, New York City, 2004.
  • M. Sageman, Understanding Terror Networks, University of Pennsylvania Press, Philadelphia, 2004.
  • T.H. Tønnessen, Heirs of Zarqawi or Saddam? The relationship between al-Qaida in Iraq and the Islamic State, Perspectives on Terrorism 9(4), pp. 48 - 60.

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